The summary and critique of the article making ethical decisions

Respect for Autonomy Any notion of moral decision-making assumes that rational agents are involved in making informed and voluntary decisions. In health care decisions, our respect for the autonomy of the patient would, in common parlance, imply that the patient has the capacity to act intentionally, with understanding, and without controlling influences that would mitigate against a free and voluntary act. See also Informed Consent.

The summary and critique of the article making ethical decisions

Lawrence THE HANDLE, which varies in length according to the height of its user, and in some cases is made by that user to his or her specifications, is like most of the other parts of the tool in that it has a name and thus a character of its own.

I call it the snath, as do most of us in the UK, though variations include the snathe, the snaithe, the snead, and the sned.

Onto the snath are attached two hand grips, adjusted for the height of the user. On the bottom of the snath is a small hole, a rubberized protector, and a metal D-ring with two hex sockets.

Into this little assemblage slides the tang of the blade. This thin crescent of steel is the fulcrum of the whole tool. From the genus blade fans out a number of ever-evolving species, each seeking out and colonizing new niches. I also have a couple of ditch blades which, despite the name, are not used for mowing ditches in particular, but are all-purpose cutting tools that can manage anything from fine grass to tousled brambles and a bush blade, which is as thick as a billhook and can take down small trees.

These are the big mammals you can see and hear. Beneath and around them scuttle any number of harder-to-spot competitors for the summer grass, all finding their place in the ecosystem of the tool.

None of them, of course, is any use at all unless it is kept sharp, really sharp: You need to take a couple of stones out into the field with you and use them regularly—every five minutes or so—to keep the edge honed.

And you need to know how to use your peening anvil, and when.

The summary and critique of the article making ethical decisions

When the edge of your blade thickens with overuse and oversharpening, you need to draw the edge out by peening it—cold-forging the blade with hammer and small anvil. Probably you never master it, just as you never really master anything.

That lack of mastery, and the promise of one day reaching it, is part of the complex beauty of the tool. Etymology can be interesting. Scythe, originally rendered sithe, is an Old English word, indicating that the tool has been in use in these islands for at least a thousand years.

But archaeology pushes that date much further out; Roman scythes have been found with blades nearly two meters long. Basic, curved cutting tools for use on grass date back at least ten thousand years, to the dawn of agriculture and thus to the dawn of civilizations.

Like the tool, the word, too, has older origins. The Proto-Indo-European root of scythe is the word sek, meaning to cut, or to divide. Sek is also the root word of sickle, saw, schism, sex, and science. Some books do that, from time to time, and this is beginning to shape up as one of them.

By his own admission, his arguments are not new. But the clarity with which he makes them, and his refusal to obfuscate, are refreshing.

I seem to be at a point in my life where I am open to hearing this again. Here are the four premises with which he begins the book: Technological progress is carrying us to inevitable disaster.

Only the collapse of modern technological civilization can avert disaster. What is needed is a new revolutionary movement, dedicated to the elimination of technological society.

The summary and critique of the article making ethical decisions

I have a tendency toward sentimentality around these issues, so I appreciate his discipline. There are two reasons for this. Firstly, if I do end up agreeing with him—and with other such critics I have been exploring recently, such as Jacques Ellul and D.

Lewis and Ivan Illich—I am going to have to change my life in quite profound ways. It has a broadband connection and all sorts of fancy capabilities I have never tried or wanted to use.

I mainly use it for typing.Bringing Ethics into the Classroom: Making a Case for Frameworks, process in which they have to learn to make ethical decisions about instructional practices on their own (Huling & Resta, ; Moir, ). For example, preservice teachers in special education learn about the special The ethic of critique illuminates flaws, but.

Ethical Decisions in Turbulent Times In Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education: Applying Theoretical Perspectives to Complex Dilemmas, Returning to the case of the preschool leader on Sept.

11, the multiple ethical paradigms of justice, critique, care and the profession can be useful. Welcome to my “Forks Over Knives” analysis, AKA the longest movie review you’ll ever attempt to read. Thanks for stopping by! In case you aren’t yet convinced that I’ve made it my life’s mission to critique everything related to T.

Colin Campbell, this should seal the deal. The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School by elementary school principals in making ethical decisions. 2 Theoretical Perspective The theoretical framework from Shapiro and Stefkovich, using four ethical paradigms of justice, critique, care and the profession created the foundation for this study.

The bedrock of. Business ethics (also known as corporate ethics) is a form of applied ethics or professional ethics, that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business vetconnexx.com applies to all aspects of business conduct and is relevant to the conduct of individuals and entire organizations.

These ethics originate from individuals, organizational statements or. Making sense of the “clean label” trends: A review of consumer food choice behavior and discussion of industry implications.

Michel Foucault (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)